Life Sciences Courses | Educartis

Life Sciences Courses

Did you enjoy studying biology at school? If you answered yes, then a career in the Life Sciences might be for you because biology forms the foundation of this field. 

Clipboard variant with lists and checks194courses available
Diploma72leaners applied last year

Career options and possible career trajectory

LayersBioinformatics
LayersBotany Cellular
LayersBiology and Anatomical Scientist
LayersEcology and Evolutionary Biologist
LayersBiologist

Recommended Competencies

  • Problem solving skills
  • Analytical mind
  • Life science exposure
  • Organization Skills
  • Research Skills

Skills to learn next

  • Biology
  • Chemistry

What are the Life Sciences?

They’re a cluster of subjects concerned with studying living organisms like plants, microorganisms and, of course, human beings. There are a host of subjects that fall under the Life Sciences umbrella, such as genetics, botany, zoology, microbiology, physiology and biochemistry.

Think the Life Sciences are dull? Think again! Advances in science and technology mean that this field is cutting-edge. And the best part is that you can help make important advances for humans and our planet. Think about how people in the Life Sciences are creating alternative fuel sources from plants and finding cures for infectious diseases.

What degrees and diplomas can you study in the Life Sciences? Many options await you, no matter what level you are considering studying, from a short course or certificate all the way up to PhD programmes. Undergraduate degrees and programmes include the BTech in Biotechnology, Diploma in Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, and the BSc in Biochemistry.

Don’t know exactly what you want to study? That’s ok, because qualifications in the Life Sciences allow you to keep your options open rather than being funneled into a specific career straight away. Over the course of your studies you can discover the area in which you’d like to specialise.

What jobs can you get with a Life Sciences qualification? There are too many career opportunities to mention them all, but the best part of these jobs is that they’re rewarding. You could become an immunologist and help prevent people from contracting diseases. Or you could become an embryologist using technology to assisting people with fertility problems. 

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What are the Life Sciences?

They’re a cluster of subjects concerned with studying living organisms like plants, microorganisms and, of course, human beings. There are a host of subjects that fall under the Life Sciences umbrella, such as genetics, botany, zoology, microbiology, physiology and biochemistry.

Think the Life Sciences are dull? Think again! Advances in science and technology mean that this field is cutting-edge. And the best part is that you can help make important advances for humans and our planet. Think about how people in the Life Sciences are creating alternative fuel sources from plants and finding cures for infectious diseases.

What degrees and diplomas can you study in the Life Sciences? Many options await you, no matter what level you are considering studying, from a short course or certificate all the way up to PhD programmes. Undergraduate degrees and programmes include the BTech in Biotechnology, Diploma in Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation, and the BSc in Biochemistry.

Don’t know exactly what you want to study? That’s ok, because qualifications in the Life Sciences allow you to keep your options open rather than being funneled into a specific career straight away. Over the course of your studies you can discover the area in which you’d like to specialise.

What jobs can you get with a Life Sciences qualification? There are too many career opportunities to mention them all, but the best part of these jobs is that they’re rewarding. You could become an immunologist and help prevent people from contracting diseases. Or you could become an embryologist using technology to assisting people with fertility problems.